We offer you a Memorable

Experience

There are 300 million photos uploaded only to Facebook every day. Most of them end up on hard drives which we never plug-in again.

At Tintype Berlin we believe in creating a tangible value, handcrafting unique silver photographs, for those who to dare think differently.

Each antique portrait is prepared with respect to traditional formulas, spiced up with passion and garnished with love.

We offer you a Memorable

Experience

There are 300 million photos uploaded only to Facebook every day. Most of them end up on hard drives which we never plug-in again. At Tintype Berlin we believe in creating a tangible value, handcrafting unique silver photographs, for those who to dare think differently. Each antique portrait is prepared with respect to traditional formulas, spiced up with passion and garnished with love.

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Tintypes

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olding one of these antique style portraits in your hand makes you understand why they are so special and precious. In the age of mass production and digitalisation they don’t seem to fit. But exactly because of that, the qualities of these mesmerizing artifacts satisfy those who swim against the mainstream. Those looking for a unique gift or extension of their style. Those who are overwhelmed with the cliche of selfies or simply like to own beautiful things.

They have proven to withstand the test of time for over 150 years.

Tintypes and Ambrotypes are one-of-a-kind photographs hand-crafted with the use of the antique Wet Plate Collodion process invented in 1851 by an Englishman, Frederick Scott Archer.

 

Tintypes, made on thin metal plate and Ambrotypes, made on glass plate are created with the same antique formula – a liquid emulsion called collodion. The special mesmerising quality they owe to the image being formed by tiny particles of pure silver suspended in the thin layer of collodion.

Initially, collodion portraits were made exclusively on glass. Despite being a more affordable alternative to the previously popular Daguerreotypes, they were still only in reach of rather wealthy people. The price of a single Ambrotype was often equal to a decent month’s salary. They were truly photographic jewels of the Victorian era, often kept in little ornate cases, offering an exclusive look and elegant, precious feel.

Tintypes, also know as Melainotypes or Ferrotypes replaced the glass substrate with a thin metal plate. Because of this development, along with a few other factors, their prices dropped significantly, making photography a truly democratic medium – affordable and available to masses. During the American Civil war in the 1860’s, soldiers would often have these taken to send them back home to their families.

Each portrait is a truly unique piece – there is no negative, no printing, no copy. The plate that is prepared in front of you and exposed in the camera, is the very same one that you will take home. Collodion photographs are extremely durable. Antique portraits have proven to withstand the test of time for over 150 years. They are often treasured by families as their heirloom for future generations.

Tintypes

H

olding one of these antique style portraits in your hand makes you understand why they are so special and precious. In the age of mass production and digitalisation they don’t seem to fit. But exactly because of that, the qualities of these mesmerizing artifacts satisfy those who swim against the mainstream. Those looking for a unique gift or extension of their style. Those who are overwhelmed with the cliche of selfies or simply like to own beautiful things.

They have proven to withstand the test of time for over 150 years.

Tintypes and Ambrotypes are one-of-a-kind photographs hand-crafted with the use of the antique Wet Plate Collodion process invented in 1851 by an Englishman, Frederick Scott Archer.

 

Tintypes, made on thin aluminum plate and Ambrotypes, made on glass plate are created with the same antique formula – a liquid emulsion called collodion. The special mesmerising quality they owe to the image being formed by tiny particles of pure silver suspended in the thin layer of collodion.

Initially, collodion portraits were made exclusively on glass. Despite being a more affordable alternative to the previously popular Daguerreotypes, they were still only in reach of rather wealthy people. The price of a single Ambrotype was often equal to a decent month’s salary. They were truly photographic jewels of the Victorian era, often kept in little ornate cases, offering an exclusive look and elegant, precious feel.

Tintypes, also know as Melainotypes or Ferrotypes replaced the glass substrate with a thin metal plate. Because of this development, along with a few other factors, their prices dropped significantly, making photography a truly democratic medium – affordable and available to masses. During the American Civil war in the 1860’s, soldiers would often have these taken to send them back home to their families.

Each portrait is a truly unique piece – there is no negative, no printing, no copy. The plate that is prepared in front of you and exposed in the camera, is the very same one that you will take home. Collodion photographs are extremely durable. Antique portraits have proven to withstand the test of time for over 150 years. They are often treasured by families as their heirloom for future generations.

Process_1_w_text

T

oday, among many of the younger generation you can find those who have never seen a negative. Countless photographs are one click away, even without reading the camera manual. Faster, bigger and cheaper – we take it for granted.

 

Photography, as we know it today, is a result of nearly 200 years of evolution which goes back far beyond the celluloid film. Wet Plate Collodion is one of the first photographic processes ever invented. Frederic Scott Archer has introduced it to the public in 1851. Publishing the fully working formula in the March issue of The Chemist, without previously patenting it he “gave” the process for free to the people.

Invented in 1851, quickly dominated the whole western world.

It has quickly dominated the whole Europe and a few months later, the United States. Pushing, the previously popular Talbotype and Daguerreotype processes, out of the market. It remained a superior method of image making until late 1880’s. Being slowly replaced by the Dry Plate process, by the end of 19th century it had almost been forgotten.

It is a very peculiar and cumbersome process, yet inspiring and fascinating. Due to its fragile nature it can be frustrating and unpredictable but also very rewarding. Not a single plate is free from imperfections but these only add a unique charm to the photographs. One can grasp the basics within 2-Day Workshop, but mastering the process, is a lifetime project.

Each photograph is created by hand by pouring a liquid emulsion onto a metal or glass plate. After making it sensitive to light the plate is exposed in the camera and developed immediately. The guests are always offered to watch this exquisite moment. In the end the plate receives a protective layer of varnish made from natural resin and lavender oil.

In the last decade the process has undergone a notable revival, paradoxically, owing its popularity to the widespread digitalisation. For many, the photography is no more what it used to be. Missing the magic charm and sense of craft they look for other means of their artistic expression, a new weekend hobby or an alternative way to satisfy their client’s needs.

Process_1_w_text

T

oday, among many of the younger generation you can find those who have never seen a negative. Countless photographs are one click away, even without reading the camera manual. Faster, bigger and cheaper – we take it for granted. Photography, as we know it today, is a result of nearly 200 years of evolution which goes back far beyond the celluloid film. Wet Plate Collodion is one of the first photographic processes ever invented. Frederic Scott Archer has introduced it to the public in 1851. Publishing the fully working formula in the March issue of The Chemist, without previously patenting it he “gave” the process for free to the people.

Invented in 1851, quickly dominated the whole western world.

It has quickly dominated the whole Europe and a few months later, the United States. Pushing, the previously popular Talbotype and Daguerreotype processes, out of the market. It remained a superior method of image making until late 1880’s. Being slowly replaced by the Dry Plate process, by the end of 19th century it had almost been forgotten.

It is a very peculiar and cumbersome process, yet inspiring and fascinating. Due to its fragile nature it can be frustrating and unpredictable but also very rewarding. Not a single plate is free from imperfections but these only add a unique charm to the photographs. One can grasp the basics within 2-Day Workshop, but mastering the process, is a lifetime project.

Each photograph is created by hand by pouring a liquid emulsion onto a metal or glass plate. After making it sensitive to light the plate is exposed in the camera and developed immediately. The guests are always offered to watch this exquisite moment. In the end the plate receives a protective layer of varnish made from natural resin and lavender oil.

In the last decade the process has undergone a notable revival, paradoxically, owing its popularity to the widespread digitalisation. For many, the photography is no more what it used to be. Missing the magic charm and sense of craft they look for other means of their artistic expression, a new weekend hobby or an alternative way to satisfy their client’s needs.

Process_1_w_text

T

oday, among many of the younger generation you can find those who have never seen a negative. Countless photographs are one click away, even without reading the camera manual. Faster, bigger and cheaper – we take it for granted.

 

Photography, as we know it today, is a result of nearly 200 years of evolution which goes back far beyond the celluloid film. Wet Plate Collodion is one of the first photographic processes ever invented. Frederic Scott Archer has introduced it to the public in 1851. Publishing the fully working formula in the March issue of The Chemist, without previously patenting it he “gave” the process for free to the people.

Invented in 1851, quickly dominated the whole western world.

It has quickly dominated the whole Europe and a few months later, the United States. Pushing, the previously popular Talbotype and Daguerreotype processes, out of the market. It remained a superior method of image making until late 1880’s. Being slowly replaced by the Dry Plate process, by the end of 19th century it had almost been forgotten.

It is a very peculiar and cumbersome process, yet inspiring and fascinating. Due to its fragile nature it can be frustrating and unpredictable but also very rewarding. Not a single plate is free from imperfections but these only add a unique charm to the photographs. One can grasp the basics within 2-Day Workshop, but mastering the process, is a lifetime project.

Each photograph is created by hand by pouring a liquid emulsion onto a metal or glass plate. After making it sensitive to light the plate is exposed in the camera and developed immediately. The guests are always offered to watch this exquisite moment. In the end the plate receives a protective layer of varnish made from natural resin and lavender oil.

In the last decade the process has undergone a notable revival, paradoxically, owing its popularity to the widespread digitalisation. For many, the photography is no more what it used to be. Missing the magic charm and sense of craft they look for other means of their artistic expression, a new weekend hobby or an alternative way to satisfy their client’s needs.

Nessie-02

S

it down comfortably and relax. Just be yourself. Look at your shape reflected in the lens. What do you see? It is almost a meditative experience. Close your eyes, and take a deep breath… let it out slowly. Take another one… and one more. Think of something significant that happened to you recently. Celebrate that moment in your mind.

 

Let’s begin… Now I need you to remain absolutely still. Are you ready? I remove the lens cap. Everything seems to stop in that moment. The most peculiar seconds begin to count.

 

Now the nature performs its magic. The light reflecting of your face enters the lens and shines upon the plate inside the camera causing the photochemical phenomenon. The image is slowly being formed by tiny particles of silver.

 

The lens cap goes back on. You sigh out. The earth starts spinning again. Done… Thank you.

 

Now the exciting part is coming. The plate is being developed and the silver image appears right before your eyes. It never fails to impress.

Nessie 12 – the handmade, antique style camera is not only a tool but a piece of art itself and a very important part of the whole “Tintype Berlin” experience. It is an offspring of passion for the arcane craft of Wet Plate Collodion and commitment to provide the most unique experience to you. The original Petzval lens comes straight from Victorian times. If it could speak, it would certainly tell many stories about countless people it has seen before.

There is only a handful of photographers dedicated to this alternative process and even less, who build their own cameras. Starting from scratch, without any previous experience, it took several months to complete this project. Doubtlessly, it was worth going this extra mile to prove, that it is possible to swim against the mainstream, bringing back the old meaning to photography and giving you an alternative to the omnipresent digital era.

Nessie
exp_1sq
exp_2sq
exp_3sq
Nessie-02

S

it down and relax. Just be yourself. Look at your shape reflected in the lens. What do you see? It is almost a meditative experience. Close your eyes, and take a deep breath… let it out slowly. Take another one… and one more. Think of something significant that happened to you recently. Celebrate that moment in your mind.

 

Let’s begin… Now I need you to remain absolutely still. Are you ready? I remove the lens cap. Everything seems to stop in that moment. The most peculiar seconds begin to count.

 

Now the nature performs its magic. The light reflecting of your face enters the lens and shines upon the plate inside the camera causing the photochemical phenomenon. The image is slowly being formed by tiny particles of silver.

 

The lens cap goes back on. You sigh out. The earth starts spinning again. Done… Thank you.

 

Now the exciting part is coming. The plate is being developed and the silver image appears right before your eyes. It never fails to impress.

Nessie 12 – the handmade, antique style camera is not only a tool but a piece of art itself and a very important part of the whole Tintype Berlin experience. It is an offspring of passion for the arcane craft of Wet Plate Collodion and commitment to provide the most unique experience to you. The original Petzval lens comes straight from Victorian times. If it could speak, it would certainly tell many stories about countless people it has seen before.

There is only a handful of photographers dedicated to this alternative process and even less, who build their own cameras. Starting from scratch, without any previous experience, it took several months to complete this project. Doubtlessly, it was worth going this extra mile to prove, that it is possible to swim against the mainstream, bringing back the old meaning to photography and giving you an alternative to the omnipresent digital era.

Nessie
exp_1sq
exp_2sq
exp_3sq